Chippewa Square

Constructed long after the conclusion of the Revolutionary War, Chippewa Square is believed to have been finished around 1815. The square takes its name from the Battle of Chippewa that took place in Upper Canada in 1814. During the battle, the American forces, commanded by Major General Jacobs Jenning Brown, defeated the British.

As is the case with many of the squares in Savannah, a lovely sculpture resides in the center of Chippewa Square. Depicting the figure of James Oglethorpe, the sculpture was designed by Daniel Chester French and was positioned in the square in 1910.

Perry, McDonough, and Hull Streets intersect Chippewa Square, while Liberty Street runs along the ward’s southern boundary. The most imposing structure on the square is the Independent Presbyterian Church, which dates back to 1817. One of the most interest aspects about this building is that it is situated on a tithing lot rather than a trust lot. Several other buildings of historical importance are also located in the square, including the First Baptist Church, a building that was originally constructed in 1833 and later renovated in 1922. The Philbrick-Eastman House was designed in 1844 by Charles Cluskey and has been occupied by several well-known families in Savannah over the years, including the Barrows and the Hulls.

The ward is also home to several other homes of note, including the property located at 11 East Perry Street, which was originally constructed for the Minis family. Over the years, the home has been used as a boarding house and was also once owned by a prominent printmaker and artist in Savannah, Christopher Murphy, Jr. The home located at 15 West Perry Street has also been owned by several well-known Savannah families, including General Alexander Robert Lawton, who served as President of the American Bar Association.