Pulaski Square

Named for Casimir Pulaski, an immigrant from Poland who lost his life in the Siege of Savannah in 1779, Pulaski Square is one of the most beautiful squares in Savannah. Pulaski originally arrived in Savannah at the request of Benjamin Franklin after the two met in Paris. Seeking a better life, Pulaski traveled to the colonies and then fought with the French in the Continental army in an attempt to eject the British from Savannah. He later died on October 9, 1779. Even after his death, Pulaski remained revered by the local citizens. After Pulaski Square was laid out, it was named in his honor and his willingness to sacrifice his life for the city of Savannah. He is further memorialized with a bronze monument located in Monterey Square.

There is also a county and a town in Georgia named for him.

Throughout the surrounding neighborhood, visitors will encounter a number of interesting home. In fact, at one time, Pulaski Ward served as one of the largest redevelopment projects in the city. Although the homes here have since been restored, there was a time when the Georgia grey bricks used in the construction of the homes here were valued more than the homes themselves.

Bernard Street and several other side streets, such as Macon, Harris, West Jones and Charlton Streets bisect Pulaski Square. Visitors to Pulaski Ward will note that many of the homes here are comprised of row houses, paired houses, and center-hall, five bay homes. The Greek revival and Italianate styles were both used extensively throughout the designs of these homes. Most homes here are between two and four stories in height. Nestled behind the brick walls are often rose gardens that have been beautifully restored. This unique blend of styles has now come to be known as Savannah style and is largely due to the surge of construction that took place during the 1850s. Today, these homes reflect the beautiful architecture that was so popular at the time.