Whitefield Square

Named for Reverend George Whitefield who served as a minister of the colony of Georgia, Whitefield Square was positioned along Habersham Street in 1851. Reverend Whitefield also served as the rector of Christ Episcopal Church and founded the Bethesda Orphanage. The surrounding ward was named in honor of John Wesley, known as the founder of Methodism. Wesley actually began his work in Savannah while serving as a secretary to Oglethorpe, before moving on to become the rector of Christ Church. Eventually, both he and his brother were sent back to England.

Many of the homes visitors to Savannah will see today in this ward were constructed following the Civil War and reflect the Queen Anne or late-Victorian style of architecture. The lovely gazebo that resides in the center of the square is very much in keeping with the seaside Victorian theme of the surrounding neighborhood.

The First Congregational Church that resides at 421 Habersham dates back to 1895, although the original church was constructed in 1969 to serve the New England Congregationalists who traveled to the south to teach former slates at the Beach Institute in Savannah.

Situated at 408 East Gaston is a charming Queen Anne home that was constructed in 1892. With its large turret complete with portholes, Gothic windows, and bracketed cornice, this delightful home also features lovely wrap-around balconies.

Located at 412-414 East Gaston is a pair of townhomes that was constructed in 1855 by George Ash, a local builder. Although these homes were constructed in a paired sidehall style design that Ash previously used in the Federal style, what makes this pair unique is that they reflect a Greek revival style.